Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 24th Global Dentists and Pediatric Dentistry Annual Meeting London, UK.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

T P Chiang

Canada China Child Health Foundation, Canada

Keynote: Importance of Dentistry in the management of cleft lip/palate

Time : 09:25-10:00

Conference Series Dentists 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker T P Chiang photo
Biography:

T P Chiang is the President of Canada China Child Health Foundation, Canada. She has done her BSc, DDS and Doctorate in Dental Medicine from Dalhousie University, Canada. She has completed her Master of Science in Epidemiology from Harvard University. She did her Post-doctoral studies at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston Children's Hospital in Pediatric Dentistry. She is a Professor at University of British Columbia, Beijing Children's Hospital, Beijing Institute of Pediatrics and Children's Hospital of Harbin. She is the Honorary President of Nanjing Medical University Dental Hospital; Consultant at child health hospitals of Guangzhou, Suzhou Health College, and Chongqing Medical University.

Abstract:

Dentistry plays an important role in the management of cleft lip and palate. Pediatric dentist is generally the first person to have contact with the cleft child patient. It is a common congenital maxillofacial deformity involving serious tissue defects and associated problems, early treatment would allow better prognosis in the end result of cleft lip/palate treatment. There is profound tissue defect involvement with maxillary bone segment loss and tissue displacement, affecting both physical appearance and function. This deformity causes major challenges because of associated problems, i.e. feeding, conduct disorder, high treatment cost, ear infection, hearing loss, language difficulty. Prevalence of cleft lip and palate ranks extremely high among congenital anomalies in the whole world. It is the second most common birth defect in the United States. Worldwide, oral clefts in any form occur in about one in every 700 live births. In fact prevalence rate vary among different countries and even ethnic groups within the same country. Overall, higher rates have been reported in Asians and American Indians (1/500 births), and lower rates have been reported in African-derived populations (1/2,500 births). Current surgical techniques and managements greatly improve the treatment effectiveness of cleft lip/palate. Cleft lip and palate management extend beyond simple surgical repair and encompass restoration of appearance and function, psychological problem, and changes in growth and development. An integrated and multidisciplinary approach is particularly important in achieving optimal result and is almost standard in US and Canada. Collaborative team would involve: pediatric dentist, plastic surgeon, anesthesiologist, orthodontist, maxillofacial surgeon, and speech pathologist, audiologist, feeding nurse, pediatrician and otolaryngologist. Cleft sequential treatment approaches growth stages with different therapeutic targets. Neonatal period pursue physical appearance/ functionality; prepubertal period guide arch form development and completion of alveolar bone graft; puberty aims at improve function; orthognathic surgery follows growth and development completion. There are four stages of treatment approaches: neonatal phase-obturation, tissue molding and orthopedic appliance; primary and mixed dentition phase-orthodontics and orthopedics; permanent dentition-comprehensive orthodontics and orthopedics; and final phase-+/- orthognathic surgery including distraction osteogenesis. The goals of the treatment protocol are to perform pre-surgical orthopedics during infancy including selection/insertion of pre-surgical device, followed by surgical repair of cleft lip/palate. This will be followed by expansion/alignment, alveolar bone graft closure of oronasal fistula during the mixed dentition phase, fixed orthodontics during the permanent dentition phase synchronized with orthognathic surgery. This will be finalized with prosthetic and esthetic reconstruction. These dental treatments would complement the rest of the interdisciplinary team. This would enable the team to achieve maximum result in the comprehensive patient management allowing the building of proper dental arch form, facial and dental alignment, speech, esthetics, function and psychological aspects of the patient.

Keynote Forum

Reem Hanna

King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, UK

Keynote: The advantages of carbon dioxide laser applications in paediatric oral surgery: A prospective cohort study

Time : 10:00-10:35

Conference Series Dentists 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Reem Hanna photo
Biography:

Hanna R is an Associate Specialist in Oral Surgery at King’s College Hospital. She is a Registered Specialist in Oral Surgery in UK. She is honorary Senior Lecture at UCL Eastman Dental Institute where she leads the fellowship in laser dentistry and advanced oral surgery courses. She was appointed as Visiting Professor in Surgical Sciences and Integrated Diagnostics Department, University of Genoa (UNIGE) in 2015. She is a faculty member who teaches Master of Science students in laser dentistry program at UNIGE. She lectures nationally and internationally on the applications of oral laser therapy. Her great interest is utilizing photobiomodulation in tissue regeneration and neuropathic pain.

Abstract:

The aim of this study is to evaluate and demonstrate the advantages of the carbon dioxide laser in paediatric oral surgery patients in terms of less post-operative complications, healing without scaring, functional benefits, positive patient perception and acceptance of the treatment. 100 fit and healthy paediatric patients (aged 4–15 years) were recruited to undergo laser surgery for different soft tissue conditions. The outcome of these laser treatments was examined. The Wong-Baker Faces Pain Rating Scale (Fig. 1) was employed to evaluate the pain before, immediately after laser treatment in the clinic and one day after post-operatively at home. Post-operative complications and patients’ perception and satisfaction were self-reported during a review telephone call the day after treatment. The patients were reviewed two weeks after surgery. Laser parameter was 1.62 W, measured by power meter, continuous wave mode with 50% emission cycle. The beam spot size at the target tissue was 0.8 mm. The pain score pre-operative during and immediately after laser treatment was rated 0. While the pain scores one day after surgery were rated between 0 and 2, the healing time was measured over two weeks. None of the patients reported post-operative complications after surgery. Patients’ perception and acceptance were rated very well. Laser dentistry is a promising field in modern minimally invasive dentistry, which enables provision of better care for children and adolescents. In this cohort study, the use of the carbon dioxide laser therapy offers a desirable, acceptable and minimally invasive technique in the surgical management of soft tissues in paediatric oral surgery with minimal post-operative complications.

Recent Publications

  1. Suter V G, Altermatt H J, Sendi P and Mettraux G (2010) CO2 and diode laser for excisional biopsies of oral mucosal lesions. A pilot study evaluating clinical and histopathological parameters. Schweiz Monatsschr Zahnmed 120(8):664–7.
  1. Puthussery T, Shekar K and Gulati K (2011) Use of carbon dioxide laser in lingual frenectomy. J Oral Maxillofac Surg 49:580–581.
  1. Pié-Sánchez J, España-Tost A-J, Arnabat-Domínguez J and Gay-Escoda C (2012) Comparative study of upper lip frenectomy with the CO2 laser versus the Er, Cr: YSGG laser. Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal 17(2):228–23.
  1. Vescovi P, Corcione L, Meleti M, Merigo E, Fornaini C, Manfredi M, Bonanini M, Govoni P, Rocca J R and Nammour S (2010) Nd:YAG laser versus traditional scalpel. A preliminary histological analysis of specimens from the human oral mucosa. Lasers Med Sci 25(5):685–91.
  1. Puthussery T, Shekar K and Gulati K (2011) Use of carbon dioxide laser in lingual frenectomy. J Oral Maxillofac Surg 49:580–581.

Keynote Forum

Abdullah Mohammed Alzahem

King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Saudi Arabia

Keynote: Cheek-bite keratosis among temporomandibular disorders patients: An important diagnostic sign

Time : 11:00-11:35

Conference Series Dentists 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Abdullah Mohammed Alzahem photo
Biography:

Abdullah Mohammed Alzahem is an Assistant Professor in King Saud bin Abdulaziz University of Medical Education. He completed his BDS in 1995; postgraduate studies in Temporomandibular Joint Disorders and Advanced General Dentistry in USA. He was awarded the prestigious Fellowship of General Dentistry Academy (FAGD) in 2004, and in the same year appointed as Dental Consultant. He completed successfully two-year Master program in Medical Education (MME) in 2009. He completed his PhD degree in Medical Education at Erasmus University Rotterdam, and was appointed as Director of Quality Assurance in King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences.

Abstract:

Introduction: Cheek-biting commonly reported by patients with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs). This check biting may cause cheek-bite keratosis. This research aim is to study the prevalence of cheek-bite keratosis among TMDs patients.

Materials & Methods: Cross-sectional survey conducted on 373 TMDs patients seen in the TMJ clinic by one TMJ specialist since 2013. Convenient sampling technique was followed where all screened patients having TMDs included in the study.

Results: TMDs patients who have check-bite keratosis are 226 patients (60.6%). Female TMDs patients are the majority (75.60%) and 78.8% of TMDs patients with cheek bit keratosis were female. The highest number of TMDs patients (4.6%) was at age of 20 years old.

Conclusion: Cheek-bite keratosis is an important sign for TMDs screening for the general dentist in the first dental visit. Dentist who find cheek-bite keratosis during intra-oral examination, advised to ask more screening questions and do more clinical examination for TMDs.

  • Special Session
Location: Johnson
Speaker
Biography:

Ziad Noujeim is Senior Lecturer and Clinical Professor of Oral Surgery at Lebanese University, Beirut. He is attending Oral Surgeon at Lebanese Army Hospital and Baabda University Hospital. He is Diplomate of European Board of Oral Surgery, Fellow of International College of Dentists and American College of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, and former Clinical Fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard School of Dental Medicine in Boston, USA. He has published 24 articles in reputed journals. He is presently Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the Lebanese Dental Association and Section Editor of the Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery.

Abstract:

Few oral surgeons have extensive experience in the management of dental and jaw pathologies in children and adolescents. Treatment of such rare pathologies is usually multidisciplinary, but the main core is often surgical, yet not always followed by reconstructive surgery. In addition to establishing a sound histopathologic diagnosis, it is important to understand and evaluate the biological behavior of such pathologies; some of these, despite being labeled as benign, are quite aggressive clinically and can cause significant bone loss and impairment if not diagnosed early and adequately treated. Pediatric odontogenic jaw cysts and tumors are unusual, and most of them are asymptomatic, the most common lesions being the dentigerous cysts and the keratocystic odontogenic tumor. It is of utmost importance that pediatric dentists, orthodontists, and general practitioners should be familiar with these three groups of lesions which can manifest as jaw swelling, delays in dental eruptions, facial asymmetry, displacement of teeth, alteration in occlusion and loosening of associated or adjacent teeth. In our presentation, we will address a case series of pediatric dental irregularities (impacted teeth and teeth-like structures) and odontogenic cysts and tumors. All these pathologies required surgical intervention, including surgical extraction, biopsy, curettage, ostectomy, enucleation and chemoablation.

  • Oral Implantology| Public Health Dentistry |Pediatric Dentistry | Endodontics | Orthodontics & Dental Implants | Periodontics
Location: Johnson
Speaker

Chair

T P Chiang

Canada China Child Health Foundation, Canada

Speaker

Co-Chair

Francesco Inchingolo

University of Bari, Italy

Session Introduction

Gustavo Vicentis de Oliveira Fernandes

Salgado de Oliveira University, Brazil

Title: The use of Biomaterials in oral rehabilitation: New trends

Time : 13:20-13:45

Speaker
Biography:

Gustavo Vicentis de Oliveira Fernandes is a Dentist. He has completed his Master’s degree in Medical Science, and PhD in Dentistry. He has his expertise in Periodontics, Implantology and Oral rehabilitation. He is a Researcher in biomaterials, oral implants and tissue reconstruction. He is a Full Professor in Periodontics (Salgado de Oliveira University, Brazil). He has a passion in rehabilitate patients, improving the aesthetic and wellbeing. His work is based in scientific evaluation with clinical application.

Abstract:

Biomaterials revolutionized the dynamics of treatments in the area of medicine and dentistry, enabling critical tissue corrections and achieving mimicry. In this large group named biomaterials, the gold standard appears, known as autogenous, which has several growth factors involved and many favorable properties, which helps a lot in the regenerative process. Therefore, rehabilitating patients today has become more accessible and sometimes more challenging, since the professional must know which technique to use, which material to choose, and have satisfactory manual detraining to achieve the desired success. Thus, the objective of this lecture will be to present tissue reconstructions with basic and advanced techniques and techniques focused on periodontics and implantology. Finally, we can observe that the new techniques and materials, such as the collected blood, favored the treatments significantly in dentistry, making possible extreme cases.

Recent Publications

  1. Costa NMF, Yassuda DH, Sader MS, Fernandes GVO, Soares GA and Granjeiro JM (2015). Osteogenic Effect of Tricalcium Phosphate Substituted by Magnesium with Genderm® Membrane in Rat Calvarial Defect Model. Materials Science and Engineering C 61.

  1. Sena LA, Almeida MSM, Fernandes GVO, Guerra R, Castro-Silva II, Granjeiro JM and Achete CA (2014). Biocompatibility of wollastonite-poly (N -butyl-2-cyanoacrylate) composites. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 102(6).

  1. Fernandes GVO, Cavagis ADM, Ferreira CV, Olej B, Leão MS, Yano CL, Peppelenbosch M, Granjeiro JM and Zambuzzi WF(2013). Osteoblast Adhesion Dynamics: A Possible Role for ROS and LMW‐PTP. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry 115(6):1063-1069.

  1. Aline Muniz de Oliveira AM, Castro‐Silva II, Fernandes GVO, Melo BR, Alves ATNN, Júnior AS, Lima ICB and Granjeiro JM (2013). Effectiveness and acceleration of bone repair in critical‐sized rat calvarial defects using low‐level laser therapy. Laser in Surgery and Medicine. 46(1):61-67.

 

 

 

 

Speaker
Biography:

Cherif Massoud is a key opinion leader in orthodontic aligners because of his combined expertise in orthodontics on one hand and 3d printing modeling and design on the other. He is the founder and CEO of Crystalign.   

 

Abstract:

Braces are from the past. The science of orthodontics is going through a rebirth with the advancement of technology, artificial intelligence and machine learning. 3D printed invisible aligners are being used to treat severe orthodontic cases. We will present the latest techniques that are pushing the traditional boundaries.

Key words: Aligners, 3d printing, digital workflow, Crystalign

Speaker
Biography:

Mohammad Reza Salahi (DDS) was born on December 26th 1984 in Shiraz (IRAN). He completed his graduation from Shiraz medical university in Shiraz (IRAN) IN 2012. He got fellowship in implant surgery in 2016. He is working on some articles about laser in Endodontics.

 

Abstract:

Transplantation is the best treatment for organ failure. However, the patients who have to undergo transplantation should wait for a long time, and this might contribute to developing some complications. Moreover, after excessive search in medical journals, we found that previous studies mostly have focused on the oral cavity in the transplant patients, in chronic renal failure and in liver diseases. However, few studies evaluate dental health status and radiographic evaluation in liver failure or renal failure patients. This motivated us to conduct the present study to compare the renal failure and liver failure patients with normal people with regard to the findings of oral cavity and oral plain radiography. This is a descriptive study conducted on the patients with chronic renal or liver failure were registered for the transplantation on the waiting list, in Nemazee hospital transplant center. Oral examinations and oral plain graphy was requested. Having consulted the statistic professor, we assigned the participants to three groups: choronic renal failure CRF (n: 50), liver disease (n: 50), and normal group (n: 50). The software SPSS was used for data analysis. Findings: The three groups participated in the present study were the normal group (n: 50), CRF group (n: 50), and liver failure (n: 50) group. Gingival recession was observed in 16, 23, and 33 patients in Normal, CRF group, and liver failure group respectively (Pvalue<0.05). We also noticed bone loss in 13, 23, and 29 patients in normal group, CRF, liver failure group (Pvalue: 0.002). The mean number for missing teeth needed extraction and root canal therapy, the teeth for which root canal therapy was performed the teeth were filled before the study, and the teeth in need of filling for the liver failure group was more than that in the normal group. (The Pvalue was <0.05), however, the mean for CRF group was significantly lower than that for the normal group (Pvalue<0.05). Compared with the normal group the mean number for missing teeth in CRD group was significantly higher. Gingival recession and bone loss in liver failure and chronic kidney disease group were significantly more than that in the normal group. The prevalence of caries was lower in CRF patients compared with the normal group; in contrast, missing teeth, filled teeth. Dental filling and root canal therapy were lower in the liver failure patients than that in the normal group. Missing teeth was more prevalent in chronic kidney disease than normal group.

Recent Publications

1. Sagheb MM, Sharifian M, Ahmadi S, Moini M, Rais-Jalali GA, Behzadi S, Roozbeh J, Jalaian H, Nikeghbalian S, Bahador A, Salahi H, Salehipoor M, Kazemi K and Malek-Hosseini SA (2011). Comparison of immediate renal dysfunction in split and partial liver transplantation versus full size liver transplantation in Shiraz transplant centre. Ann Transplant; 16(2):36-42.

  1. Jamali R, Khonsari M, Merat S, Khoshnia M, Jafari E, Bahram Kalhori A, Abolghasemi H, Amini S, Maghsoudlu M, Deyhim MR, Rezvan H and Pourshams A(2008). Persistent alanine aminotransferase elevation among the general Iranian population: prevalence and causes World J Gastroenterol 14(18):2867-71.
  1. Sheehy EC, Roberts GJ, Beighton D and O'Brien G (2000).Oral health in children undergoing liver transplantation. Int J Paediatr Dent 10(2):109-19.
  1. de la Rosa-Garcia E, Mondragon-Padilla A, Irigoyen-Camacho ME and Bustamante-Ramirez MA (2005). Oral lesions in a group of kidney transplant patients. Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal 10(3):196-204.
  1. Grubbs V, Gregorich SE, Perez-Stable EJ and Hsu CY (2009) Health literacy and access to kidney transplantation Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 4(1):195-200.

Speaker
Biography:

Yasmeen A AlHaizan is pursuing her Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS) at College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia. In 2017, she participated in 9th Research Summer School held at King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC), which grew her interest and developed her skills in research.

Abstract:

Introduction: Professional burnout, a prolonged response to stress, would possibly affect the standards of patient care. Burnout is defined as emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and diminished personal accomplishment.

Aim: To identify and compare psychological stress and burnout levels among different job titles and specialties in dental department, MNGHA. Also, to determine the effect of marital status, age, and gender on stress and burnout levels.

Methods: Convenient sampling approach was used to distribute the questionnaire in the dental department, MNGHA (n=177, response rate=88.5%). Two validated questionnaires, psychological stress measure-9 (PSM-9) and Maslach Burnout Inventory–Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS), were used.

Results: Mean level (and standard deviation) of stress was 32.60 (11.43), with the highest stress levels seen in consultants and residents (39.17% and 38.33%). Hygienists and technicians scored the highest lack of personal accomplishment (24.53%), consultants scored the highest emotional exhaustion (24.64%), while residents scored the highest impersonal response toward patients (26.67%).

Conclusion: Participants with the job title consultant and resident are shown to be the most stressed and burnt-out category among the dental department. Specialty, gender, age and marital status are not shown to be risk factors in our study. Stress and burnout should be reduced to maintain the standards of patient care.

Huda Salem Alrakaf

Prince Sultan Military Medical City, KSA

Title: Oral histopathological changes in premature infants

Time : 15:00-15:25

Speaker
Biography:

Huda Salem Alrakaf completed her Graduation from King Saud University (KSU), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. She then obtained her Master of Science in Dentistry at KSU. In Madrid, Spain 2003, she earned her specialized certificate on high risk and special need children. Later in the year 2007, she took a course in psychopathology of children and intervention at Howard University, Washington DC, USA. Her achievements in 2001 were remarkable she did the first publication of both intra-nasal midazolan in conscious sedation of young pediatric dental patients and dental management for coach syndrome.

Abstract:

Preterm and low birth weight children comprise approximately 10% of all live births. It is an enormous global problem that is exacting a huge loss emotionally, physically and financially on families along with medical systems premature children experience many oral complications associated with their preterm birth. Prematurely born infants have short prenatal developmental period and they are prone to many serious medical problems during the neonatal period which may affect the development of oral tissue. It was reported that premature born whom were intubated had developed erosions of the maxillary anterior alveolar ridge. The dragging motion of the orotracheal tube traumatized the mucosa with consequent ulceration and pressure necrosis of the alveolar ridge and underlying tooth buds. Hence, premature neonates require assisted ventilation using nasotracheal or orotracheal tubes. However, orotracheal intubation is not free of complication. Histopathological changes to the airway, mucosa, damage to the larynx, subglottic and bronchial dentofacial deformities (primary tooth dilaceration cross bites), poor speech intelligibility. Enamel alteration (enamel hypoplasia, enamel opacities), dental size (small primary tooth crown size associated with BW should be considered studies of tooth size in all population) and changes to the dental mineral content. At the same time oral lesions represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serves as baseline in the future course of the disease. This present review is on the deleterious effect of preterm birth and oral tube on oral structures and their development. Implications for long term care and follow up of dental concerns are also discussed.

 

  • Pediatric Dentistry| Operative Dentistry | Restorative Dentistry | Dental Case Reports | Endodontics
Location: Johnson
Speaker

Chair

Reem Hanna

King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, UK

Speaker

Co-Chair

Ziad E F Noujeim

Lebanese University, Lebanon

Speaker
Biography:

Umber Zahra has completed her Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS) from Institute of Dentistry, CMH Lahore Medical and Dental College, Pakistan. Her work experience includes practicing part time in a General Practice. She chose to specialize in Operative Dentistry to gain the knowledge and skills to manage complex esthetic, restorative and endodontics cases of both children and adults. She is enrolled in the Residency Program (Operative Dentistry) at Lahore Medical and Dental College to become a Fellow of College of Physicians and Surgeons, Pakistan. She is currently working as a Post-graduate Resident and Clinical Demonstrator in the Deparmtent of Operative Dentistry, Lahore Medical and Dental College. Pakistan.

Abstract:

Oligodontia is the congenital absence of six or more than six teeth in either permanent or primary dentition. Because of the missing teeth in these patients esthetic, functional and psychological problems may arise. This article reports a rare case of non-syndromic oligodontia in an eight year old female patient of Asian origin. A total number of seven permanent and six primary anterior teeth were congentially absent. There are very few cases reported in literature in which primary teeth are congenitally missing. Psychological stress due to missing teeth was evident in the patient’s behavior. A ‘fixed anterior esthetic space maintainer’ was fabricated and fixed into the patients mouth. Conditions like oligodontia have a substantial impact on the functional and psychological maturation of the child. Management of conditions could be challenging, the key for a successful outcome is early diagnosis and proper treatment planning involving all other concerned specialties i.e. through multidisciplinary approach. The rehabilitation with an interim prosthesis, like an esthetic space maintainer or removable partial dentures, at an early age and later with osseointegrated implants has shown promising results from the functional and psychological point of view for such cases.

Speaker
Biography:

Edmond Koyess completed his graduation from Saint-Joseph University in Beirut Lebanon. He received Post-graduate certificate in Oral Biology and Endodontics from Rene Descartes, Paris. He completed his Doctorate degree in Odontologic Sciences from Lebanese University. Presently, he is Director of Master in Endodontics at Lebanese University and Fellow of International College of Dentists. He is an International Lecturer and Opinion Leader in Endodontics.

Abstract:

Postoperative pain after shaping and cleaning the canal system can vary in degree of occurrence. The most commonly described cause of postoperative pain is the presence in the root canal system and the eventual extrusion of microorganisms inevitable in addition to pushing debris of contaminated dentin, necrotic pulp tissue and. An inflammation can follow this phenomenon accompanied by acute pain due to local pressure and oedema that triggers a postoperative pain of different levels. Modern NiTi files are widely used in dental offices as well as limited practices to Endodontics. The kinematics of NiTi files are of two types: continuous rotation and reciprocating motions. Debris forcing outside the canal can be variable according to the dynamics of the shaping files whether rotating or reciprocating. Protocol of pre-enlargement as recommended by the manufacturer and the shaping procedure being comparable, it can be accepted that pain following the shaping procedures can be assessed in a randomized clinical study.

In this presentation the author will expose the study conducted in a private clinic with limited practice of endodontics by the same operator having at least two years experience using experience in both systems thus, comparing the incidence of post-instrumentation pain associated with both NiTi files system following canal shaping and cleaning. To assess the effect of shaping the canal solely without the effect of obturation, the procedures were conducted in two visits. At the second appointment patients were asked to rate the intensity of pre-instrumentation and post-instrumentation pain (at 2, 4, 6, 8, 24, 48 h) using the VAS score.

Maya Awada

Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London

Title: Dentists in the forensic field

Time : 16:30-16:55

Speaker
Biography:

Maya Awada is a dentist who graduated from the Lebanese University-School of Dental Medicine.  She has an interest in forensic science and decided to advance her knowledge in this field. She is a master student in Forensic Medical Science at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry- Queen Mary University of London.

Abstract:

Forensic odontology or forensic dentistry is the implementation of dental evidence in the legal and criminal field. It involves the application of dental knowledge mainly in the scope of human identification both in ordinary cases of individual identification and in disaster victim identification (DVI), examination of patterned injuries caused by teeth that are frequent in sexual crimes and child abuse cases and age assessment all in the interest of justice. The uniqueness of an individual dentition its resistance to temperature and time are the major reasons behind odontology being a key factor in solving forensic cases. The presentation will offer an overview of forensic odontology, the process of identification using dental records and dental imaging, the importance of this method in mass disasters such as Thailand tsunami, and the concept of bite mark analysis.

Key words: forensic dentistry, identification, victim, bite mark analysis, disaster victim identification.

Speaker
Biography:

Mohamad Saad El Masri is specialised in Special Care Dentistry (Dentistry for people with disability). His aim is to trigger the establishment of the Clinical and Academic aspect of SCD across the MENA countries-particularly Lebanon, to enable the delivery of oral healthcare for people with an impairment or disability.

Abstract:

The Arab region of the world is rapidly changing and advancing. There are striking differences from the developed world in terms of prevalence and type of diseases leading to various forms of disability. Furthermore, political challenges, financial constraints, limited healthcare systems, and negative attitudes and beliefs towards individuals with disability are all factors that can influence the provision of healthcare services for these individuals. These factors can additionally impact on access to oral healthcare, which is often not considered a priority.

Although approximately 15% of the population in the Arab states are estimated to be living with disability. Attitudes toward disability in this region have been found to be negative. There are few studies in the region with regards to the dental needs of individuals with disabilities. Dental education and training to provide oral health care for patients with disability in the Arab world are remarkably limited. Countries in the region should take advantage from the available evidence provided by the International Association for Disability and Oral Health (iADH) and the British Society for Disability and Oral Health (BSDH) and consider establishing SCD within the undergraduate curriculum.

The aims of the presentation are to review the impact of disability across the region, identify factors that may influence access to healthcare, review barriers in order to enable the imminent approach to address the provision of SCD, and outline the pathway that will enable the establishment of the Academic and Clinical Aspect of SCD in the Arab world, and particularly in Lebanon.